Wednesday, March 25, 2015

This Big Piggy Stayed Home: Butchering our first pig at home!

Yesterday, we slaughtered our first pig on the farm.
We've sent a few pigs to the butcher before, but this time we decided to try it ourselves.  And it was worth it!


Friday, March 20, 2015

Spring Clearance Sale!

Time for spring cleaning, and a sale to clear out inventory for 

Chicken Scraps Shop


Visit my shop now to get 40% off your total purchase!  Use coupon as many times as you want, now through March 31st.
Use coupon code:

SPRINGCLEAN40




Available only while current inventory lasts.  Some prints/ colors may be out of stock.  I will let you know if they are, and give you the option to choose another.

Monday, March 9, 2015

Feldman Family Penelope Is For Sale



 Full-blooded Jersey heifer:

Feldman Family Penelope

"Penny"

Born:  December 29th, 2014

Sire:  Copper

Dam:  OA Feldman Family Buttercup

AJCA Registration Pending (OA)

Dehorned.


Saturday, March 7, 2015

Available Now: Easy Birth Tea Herbal Supplement


Announcing a new addition to Chicken Scraps Shop:  Easy Birth Tea

Easy Birth Tea is a special blend of herbs to help with pregnancy, birth and recovery.  It is safe for use in humans, horses, goats, sheep and cattle.  (SOLD AS ANIMAL SUPPLEMENT ONLY.)

Wednesday, March 4, 2015

Waiting for a Foal...

Spring is right around the corner, and so is Fannie's due date.

(Sorry for the terrible quality and angle of this photo...  It was taken with a phone and I couldn't see the picture on the screen.)

Fannie (registered name:  Acuarela de Benji ) is bred to Jesse el Rubio, son of 7 time Bella Forma champion, El Chino de El Batey.

Tuesday, February 17, 2015

Quick Tips For Milking A Kicky Cow (Or Goat)


There are few things so frustrating as having a full bucket of milk kicked over, just as you are stripping out those last few squirts, and dreaming of the yogurt, cheese, or just plain creamy milk you are going to enjoy.  Even worse is when she kicks you in the nose first, then plants her dirty foot squarely in the bucket.  A kicky milker can cause all kinds of problems, and be downright dangerous.  Frequently, kicking is only a symptom of other issues, such as extreme nervousness.  
A nervous cow is a dangerous cow.
She is liable to hurt herself and other cows or people.  She may try to jump or charge through fences, and likely will attempt to break out of the stanchion if she is frightened.  This is not an article dealing with nervousness, but I will say that the cure, so far as I have experienced, is twofold:  1).  Lots of gentle, but firm handling, feeding of treats, and desensitizing her to common things she perceives as threats.
2).  Feed lots of dolomite.  Extreme nervousness may be caused by a magnesium imbalance, which can usually be corrected by feeding dolomite.

Here are a few tips I have learned from several years of milking cows; our own and others.  Several were first fresheners (who usually kick a lot), and a couple were just plain kicky (belonged to friends).


Our First Sheep Butchering

I have always liked the idea of a self-sufficient lifestyle.  (Sufficient as regards food; we will always be dependent upon God!)  Saturday, we made another step towards supplying our own food.
LilyAnn and Justice helped me butcher a sheep.
Since my ewe died last year, he was an extra mouth to feed, kind of mean, and very healthy, so we decided it was time for him to go to the freezer.  And rather than paying someone else to butcher him, and having to cart him over there, we decided to just do it ourselves.

This photo was taken several months ago.


(WARNING:  Images include a (dead) sheep being processed, and children helping with the work.)

Friday, January 16, 2015

The "Asher" Sweater




A couple of returned sweaters, and a special request have turned into a new style I am now offering:
The "Asher" sweater!


Tuesday, December 16, 2014

Merry Christmas to Little Miss Chievous!

These photos were sent to me by a happy customer, and they are too cute not to share!
(I did get permission first!)

Wednesday, December 3, 2014

Another Day With The Goats Pt. 7: Daily Kid Care and Bottle-feeding


This video gives a look at the daily feeding and care of kids.  Feeding time is an excellent opportunity to check your kids' health, and help them bond with humans so that they are friendlier.  Be prepared after a few days of feeding for them to climb all over you, even when they are not hungry!
An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure, so catching a problem or sickness at the very beginning is extremely important for your goat's health, and your own peace of mind.  A couple 1,000 mgs. of vitamin C at the beginning of a cold is worth far more than a long round of antibiotics during a bout of pneumonia.


The sweaters these kids are wearing are the original ones that I made.  I now sell them (and dog sweaters) in my farm shop.  Please stop by!